Using a periplasmic binding protein as a biosensor for thiamine

By Sophie Rugg

Twitter: @sophiejrugg

Thiamine, also known as vitamin B1, is an essential micronutrient with an important role in metabolism for all life forms. Thiamine can’t be synthesised by animals, and so has to be obtained from their diet. Until recently, detecting thiamine was limited to either the use of expensive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or a slow assay involving microbial growth. This is because there is no antibody available that is specific for thiamine, making commonly used high throughput detection techniques such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) impossible.

Periplasmic binding proteins are components of the ABC transporters of Gram-negative bacteria, and bind their substrates with high affinity and specificity to enable them to be transported into the bacterial cell. These properties of high affinity binding and specificity make periplasmic binding proteins ideal for use as the recognition element in a biosensor. As bacterial ABC transporters are used for the import of nutrients, including a transporter for thiamine, many of these binding proteins have evolved to recognise small molecules which it may be difficult to raise an antibody against.

Edwards et al., (2016) developed a biosensor for thiamine based on the periplasmic binding protein for thiamine from Escherichia coli. This binding protein was incorporated into dye-encapsulating liposomes in order to amplify the signal. Immobilised to the surface of a streptavidin coated plate is biotin conjugated thiamine analogue. The thiamine analogue is connected to the biotin via a long polyethylene glycol (PEG)linker, so that the thiamine analogue doesn’t get in the way of the biotin binding the streptavidin coating. The immobilised thiamine analogue binds to the periplasmic binding protein with lower affinity than thiamine. After the thiamine containing sample has been added, any material not bound to the surface is removed. Any liposomes still stuck to the surface of the plate are lysed and the resulting dye concentration is inversely proportional to the thiamine concentration.

slide1
Overview of assay for thiamine detection taken from Edwards et al., (2016). Competitive assay with biotin conjugated thiamine analogue immobilized via streptavidin in microtiter plates and detected via periplasmic binding protein for thiamine conjugated to the lipid bilayer of dye encapsulating liposomes (left). After competition with sample thiamine, unbound materials are removed (middle) and liposomes remaining bound are lysed to release dye yielding a signal inversely proportional to thiamine concentration (right).

This work shows that periplasmic binding proteins can be used effectively in biosensors , particularly where there is no antibody available. With the wide range of periplasmic binding proteins evolved by bacteria to be able to transport nutrients into their cells, this technique is open to use across a wide range of applications provided that a suitable analogue of the substrate can be immobilised to the surface of a plate.

Source: Edwards et al., 2016. High-Throughput Detection of Thiamine Using Periplasmic Binding Protein-Based Biorecognition. Analytical  Chemisty88 (16), pp 8248–8256. DOI: 10.1021/acs.analchem.6b02092

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